Having Fun With Your Logs

Topic 31940 | Page 10

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TwoSides11's Comment
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This is a great thread. I have learned a lot from reading through this, for example the break in the 14hr clock from using the split berth. That will help me out now that I understand what it actually does. Please continue to share how you guys/gals manage your clocks. I hope no one will feel like they are being "one upped" or being a "one upper" We are all in different divisions and what works for a flatbed driver might not be as productive for a Van/reefer/tanker driver. Also being OTR or regional. But with all the info on the table maybe we can use some different tactics from each other.

As a rookie I can say this has been very helpful and I want to thank you all for engaging in this conversation. Also like Brett said, please share the real world factors you guys face and possible solutions for coming across them. Stay safe out there drivers!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PackRat's Comment
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I was forced into a long 34 plus hour reset this weekend in my least favorite state. I delivered and parked at 1000 Friday and did not have the next load until 1500 Sunday (only 125 miles away).

I wanted to slit my wrists after the first 16 hours.

Turtle's Comment
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rofl-2.gif

It ain't for everybody

Old School's Comment
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One of the important factors about time management to me is to maintain some consistency in your levels of production. It is quite easy to have a really solid week and then a couple of bad weeks before you turn another good week. This was one of my problems as a rookie. I recognized it and would try to make adjustments until I started building more consistency. This isn't always the driver's fault, but as a rookie I just assumed everything that hindered me could be addressed somewhat in the way I approached things. I always tried to solve things with my own solutions. It is easy to blame your driver manager or load planners and still never be able to get anything done that changes things for you.

Over the years I developed my own methods of strong communications with my support team in the office. I make sure they are updated daily on my progress and my times of delivery and availability. It helps them do their jobs efficiently. When they can manage your loads with efficiency, you can be more productive. I always considered a big part of my job was to help my driver manager look good to the people who are measuring his performance. That is a completely foreign ideology in trucking. My DM has made comments to me in emails that go something like this. "You have singlehandedly made my life easier." That is a rare compliment given to a driver. I have no doubt some of you have had similar things said to you, but it is rare for a driver to have any sort of focus beyond themselves.

I found out early on in my trucking career that if I could scratch someones back who was handling my loads, they would reciprocate. I don't pander and grovel to anybody. I make darn sure I do everything I say, and I treat everyone I work with respectfully and kindly. Trucking is all about trust and performance. You will not be trusted unless you have a track record of getting things done. I still remember when I first started this dedicated account. I knew I was getting runs that had wide windows of delivery times and short miles on them. I knew there were better runs available, but I was not getting them.

I just kept on doing my job, making early deliveries when possible, moving appointments forward with customers, and keeping my dispatcher updated on what I was doing. Finally I made an appointment with him for a sit down meeting. At that meeting I just laid it out that I understood I was still being tested, but I was ready to be tested with something a little more challenging. He just grinned and said, "Alright, if you think you are ready, I will start putting you on some better loads." That was years ago, and they have not let up since. I get challenged each and every week. I get it done, and they pretty much know how it will go down. I was new back then, and there were plenty of guys there who had seniority over me. It sort of sent shock waves through our small group of drivers when the senior guys realized this newbie was competing with the old hands. Today I have the longest tenure in our group of drivers. I also have a stellar record of getting things done. Those things weigh heavily in my favor on this account.

A lot of new drivers miss out on how competitive this job is. Your driver managers know who they can count on. They will continually rely on those proven competitors to get things done that they deem important. Time management is one of the critical things we do so that we can prove ourselves trustworthy. I can't even tell you how many times my driver manager has started a message to me with this line... "Okay Mr. Hours, can you help me out with this load?" He is frustrated because he has work for us to do and the folks he wanted to count on were out of hours or just didn't think they had enough to make it happen. He calls me "Mr. Hours" because I manage my clock in such a way that I can always be available to his needs or the needs of our dedicated customer.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Funny, I got pulled over today for a level 3 inspection. It's the first inspection I've had. Wyoming state trooper. Nice guy. My truck was clean, the cab tidy, all my paperwork in order, back up paper logs, everything.

He asked me if I had uploaded my logs before. I replied no, he said he'd done it a couple times, and we figured it out together.

I had absolutely no fear, I run my logs tight, never a violation. Any time my device has had errors I've called in to IT and had it righted.

He came back from his cruiser and said "very nice, you run a tight ship" I'd love to stay and chat, but I have something pressing.

It was gratifying to know that my logs and time was in order and I had nothing to worry about.

0230666001657509691.jpg

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Davy!

Scan a copy of that in with your paperwork on your load. Tell your driver manager he owes you some money. Your driver manager has to put that in for payroll, but Knight will pay you for a clean inspection like that. I had one in Texas last month.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
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Well done Davy! Check that off your bucket list.

BK's Comment
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Davy, you rock. Good job!

PJ's Comment
member avatar

This is the safety check week and troopers are going to be pulling over alot of trucks.

Davy great job on keeping everything tight.

OS I know exactly how your folks feel. In the tanker business I got similiar comments alot. Since going on my own I have developed a reputation amongst the granite folks and I get alot of calls asking if I’m available. Most of these folks I don’t know. They found out by word of mouth from folks I have done some loads for. As far as managing my clock, not so much anymore. I haul a load out and they are actually paying me to come back empty to get me back quicker.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Since going on my own I have developed a reputation amongst the granite folks and I get alot of calls asking if I’m available.

Dial 1-88R-OK-SOLID for all your granite hauling wants and needs folks!

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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