Starting In 2nd Gear From A Stop!

Topic 31992 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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You have it right. You can do the same thing on an incline. The only difference is that you must keep your foot on the brake until the clutch begins to engage when you're on an incline. Once you feel the clutch begin to engage you can release the brake without rolling backward. Then, once you fully release the clutch, you can hit the gas and accelerate.

Again, even on an incline, you will not feather the clutch while you press the gas pedal. Let the clutch out to get the truck rolling and then hit the gas once the clutch is fully released. If the truck is struggling to roll forward while you're releasing the clutch, then the gear you're in is too high.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Honestly if you are empty I would start in 3rd or even 4th. If I start in 2nd empty the RPMs come up so fast it is hard to catch the next gear.

I wouldn't skip shift either in Illinois that was a failure they wanted to see you hit every gear up or down.

Be easy on the gas pedal once it starts to catch, in 2nd gear with no load the RPMs will come up fast it will be extremely easy to over rev and miss 3rd.

BK's Comment
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I have to admit I admire drivers who are still driving manuals or who possess the ability to drive them well. I trained with Schneider and had a 3 million miler for my two week road training. He wanted me to start in 3rd all the time, for whatever it’s worth.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
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Loaded always start in 2nd, 1st if off-road. Empty; still 2nd but I’m onto 3rd in about 1 second.

Starting out in a higher gear especially when loaded will heat up the clutch and place unnecessary stress on drivetrain components. Not smart, probably lazy.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

It's funny, I'm guessing that's why our automated manuals always start in 4th, it drives me nuts because it knocks off my urge to move when loaded. I put it in manual and start in second. I figured I probably wasn't supposed to but it's way smoother for me in those conditions.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Papa Pig's Comment
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Ocho91. That is exactly how you are supposed to do it. What you are describing is what I call clutch control. That should have been Taught from day one . Cause it’s pretty darned important!

Instructors where I teach are split on which gear to have students start off in. I am a proponent that you get better at shifting by…….shifting. Going through each gear, starting in second. Develops muscle memory and helps you develop rpm control and smooth shift rhythm. And it kind of ****es me off when I get a student that has been out with other instructors that was trained to start in 4th and keeps stalling. Then they are resistant to trying it my way because they are scared to do something new. I have to explain that the other instructors weren’t wrong per say but to try it my way and see which one works better. By the end of our session they tend to agree that starting lower is definitely the way to go..

I think it boils down to laziness. Some instructors just want to get them rolling with minimal shifting and grinding saying “ it’s good enough for the test” but I don’t buy that. I want to teach them how to be better not just to test. The one time that I have them start out in 4th is when pointed with the nose downhill. I will explain to them if they don’t shift quickly they will be going too fast to upshift to 5th and may need to skip to 6th. But the key is explain what you are wanting them to do explain why they are grinding and it isn’t going into gear. Is it hand placement, shift rhythm,clutch control, improper speed, improper rpm control!? I hate “teachers” that just yell and don’t teach.

Another bad habit I have to break is students being taught that they can take almost any turn in 6th gear. It’s like they are afraid to slow down and downshift into low range. THE TIGHTER THE TURN THE LOWER THE GEAR!

Good luck in your journey!!

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Loaded I always start in 2nd. Then usually skip and go straight to 4th. As said that is much easier on the equipment. Whatever works best for you and the equipment is the best way to do it.

LOVE your new avatar, PJ !!

That's exactly how Tom taught me.... third gear is sorda 'useless..' haha! (Or should I say, just 'neglected?')

Best always, pal !

~ Anne ~

James H.'s Comment
member avatar

Just didn’t want to impede traffic after I get it rolling

In my opinion, this is not something you should be worrying about. With these large, heavy vehicles, sometimes it's unavoidable. We take forever to accelerate, go slowly around turns, and four-wheelers will get ****ed. That's their problem, don't let them make it yours. Take as much time and space as you feel you need to be safe. As you get more experienced you may be able to do things quicker, but that shouldn't be your focus.

FWIW, I usually start in 2nd out of habit, since that's the way I was taught.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Anne, took it this morning at my delivery in Clearwater Fl. They are building a castle. 1 more load next week.

Yes my 3rd gear should last forever. I rarely use it.

Wile E.'s Comment
member avatar

Instructors where I teach are split on which gear to have students start off in. I am a proponent that you get better at shifting by…….shifting. Going through each gear, starting in second. Develops muscle memory and helps you develop rpm control and smooth shift rhythm. And it kind of ****es me off when I get a student that has been out with other instructors that was trained to start in 4th and keeps stalling. Then they are resistant to trying it my way because they are scared to do something new. I have to explain that the other instructors weren’t wrong per say but to try it my way and see which one works better. By the end of our session they tend to agree that starting lower is definitely the way to go..

Bold added for emphasis. This was the opinion of the training I had back in the 70's through Ryder. Their facility in McDonough, GA had a track around the backing field and garage, and we went around that thing all day in low range. Trucks were 13 speed, we didn't use Low, so it was 1 ,2, 3, 4, then down through each gear to first. Over and over and over...

Then we got on the road, where again we were required to go through all the gears up, and when we took a ramp off the highway, or approached a stop sign, we started down shifting a LONG way before, and went down through each and every split in high range, to low range, all the way back to 1st. They told us, you won't do this on the job, but we want you to learn how to shift.

Fast forward to present school: the instructors demonstrated that you could start in 4th on the manual, but they don't insist on it. It felt like the truck was lugging a bit, so I start in 3rd or sometimes 2nd, depends if I'm on a grade or not. Just get it moving good with no strain, and I'm up into high range on the 10 speed pretty quick.

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