Drivers Like This Make Us All Look Bad.

Topic 32111 | Page 1

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

50k pound unsecured load

People will see this or hear about it and think we are all this stuid.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

wtf.gif

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

50k pound unsecured load

People will see this or hear about it and think we are all this stuPId.

Yep, saw that also. What a disgrace, to say the least. SMDH isn't even enough.

Thanks for sharing, (The shaming is on them!)

~ Anne ~

ps: Might as well cage the brakes with a pitchfork, tuning fork, etc!!! ... oh my wow.

rofl-3.gif sorry.gif rofl-3.gif

wtf.gif

Hey, G ... WWYD? (Or . . . YOUR company, to a 'driver?')

confused.gif wtf-2.gif confused.gif

I know I know much less than y'all actual drivers, but I've sure seen enough ^^^ to shake my head into the next timezone!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Anne inquired…

Hey, G ... WWYD? (Or . . . YOUR company, to a 'driver?')

WWID? I’d never trailer a piece of equipment more than 10’ without first securing it. It’s easy to lay the entire blame on the driver who failed to secure their equipment or check their equipment was secure before moving the truck.

My thought on this?

The driver is ultimately responsible. However… I also think the driver’s company should take some responsibility here. Was he trained properly? How was the driver evaluated throughout that process? A lot of things led up to this. Was the driver qualified for this. See what I’m getting at?

How could this happen? Easy… at least one person failed to perform their job. Possibly multiple layers of laziness, incompetence, or both.

Moving heavy equipment is a small subset of trucking. Not every driver is suited for performing this type of work. In fact I’d say many aren’t. Flatbedding on steroids. It’s both physically and mentally demanding, especially in the beginning. I thought I was a good driver… 57’, three or four axles and weight in excess of 100,000lbs GCWR , is an incredibly humbling and taxing experience… on and off road. Especially in the beginning. The devil is in getting all the details right and providing trained experienced oversight with any new driver entering into this and subsequently meeting the challenges of the learning curve. It’s serious business.

I consider myself a total neophyte at moving equipment. I’m still learning… and fortunately I have a really great teacher, a stickler for details. I can assure anyone reading my reply, moving a piece of equipment any size requires the utmost care in securement and operation. Check and recheck securement.

The example in the link was a colossal fail on many levels, in all likelihood the driver lacks experience and also training. Even if they were not charged with securing the excavator, they failed their pre-trip inspection. It’s fortunate the machine didn’t move causing a significant weight imbalance. Driver got lucky.

Anyway… my two cents.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

GCWR:

Gross Combined Weight Rating

The GCWR refers to the total weight of a vehicle, including all trailers.

Chris W.'s Comment
member avatar

Welp........ Glad I wasn't behind him

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I hauled heavy equipment locally at one time, and a guy tried to get me to do that. He loaded his bulldozer on there and said, "Let's go!"

I said, "We'll chain it down first, and then we'll go."

He said we were only going like two miles.

I asked, "Ok, so if I get it there safely with no chains on it, what is my reward?"

There was no reward.

I said, "Well, that's not a worthwhile risk/reward ratio, so we'll chain it down this time. Next time, make it worth the risk, and I'll consider it!"

He just smiled.

People often have no concerns about talking you into doing something dangerous when they know they won't take the fall for it. Don't let anyone talk you into something when you already know better!

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

think we are all this stupid.

Just some of us.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

I saw this. IDC if you're knew or experienced, this is a no go on so many levels. My guess is this was an experienced driver. I don't think a new driver would take this kind of a risk.

confused.gif

50k pound unsecured load

People will see this or hear about it and think we are all this stuid.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

YIKES !! crazy stuff, and people. Long ago I heard a lot of people killed in auto wrecks, are usually, within a mile or 2 from home....So yeah, don't matter if your only going 1 or 2 blocks like that, someone could possibly be killed from lack of common sense/safety

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

On my behalf,

Thanks, y'all for replies.

One thing I'm NOT at all familiar with ... the big Tonka Toys.

Guess THAT guy wasn't, either.

~ Anne ~

Anne inquired…

double-quotes-start.png

Hey, G ... WWYD? (Or . . . YOUR company, to a 'driver?')

double-quotes-end.png

WWID? I’d never trailer a piece of equipment more than 10’ without first securing it. It’s easy to lay the entire blame on the driver who failed to secure their equipment or check their equipment was secure before moving the truck.

My thought on this?

The driver is ultimately responsible. However… I also think the driver’s company should take some responsibility here. Was he trained properly? How was the driver evaluated throughout that process? A lot of things led up to this. Was the driver qualified for this. See what I’m getting at?

How could this happen? Easy… at least one person failed to perform their job. Possibly multiple layers of laziness, incompetence, or both.

Moving heavy equipment is a small subset of trucking. Not every driver is suited for performing this type of work. In fact I’d say many aren’t. Flatbedding on steroids. It’s both physically and mentally demanding, especially in the beginning. I thought I was a good driver… 57’, three or four axles and weight in excess of 100,000lbs GCWR , is an incredibly humbling and taxing experience… on and off road. Especially in the beginning. The devil is in getting all the details right and providing trained experienced oversight with any new driver entering into this and subsequently meeting the challenges of the learning curve. It’s serious business.

I consider myself a total neophyte at moving equipment. I’m still learning… and fortunately I have a really great teacher, a stickler for details. I can assure anyone reading my reply, moving a piece of equipment any size requires the utmost care in securement and operation. Check and recheck securement.

The example in the link was a colossal fail on many levels, in all likelihood the driver lacks experience and also training. Even if they were not charged with securing the excavator, they failed their pre-trip inspection. It’s fortunate the machine didn’t move causing a significant weight imbalance. Driver got lucky.

Anyway… my two cents.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

GCWR:

Gross Combined Weight Rating

The GCWR refers to the total weight of a vehicle, including all trailers.

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