My Horrible Experience With Schneider Training Center In Phoenix AZ, Read Before You Apply

Topic 32176 | Page 6

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Banks's Comment
member avatar
Hotel had not that great pool and jacuzzi. 

Not what you're there for.

I explained them multiple times in a five years old language that it doesn't make sense

I can imagine that went over well.

115 degrees in shade, muuch more under sun.

So what? In the real world you have zero control over weather conditions.

but their own drivers in the yard we're not doing it at all or they were just walking around the trailer and tractor.

Mind your business.

He was screaming and bumping on the dashboard or the body of trailer to tell me why I am wrong

He probably wasn't getting your attention any other way.

He kept invalidating whatever we learned in the trucking school, telling us they are wrong and we do it differently at Schneider. 

That's how every company does it. That's why they have orientation for new hires. It's why company sponsored training is recommended.

Drink choice was world worst coffee in Styrofoam cups!!

I'm going to have to have a talk with my bosses. We don't get coffee.

I caught them using drug or fainting under drug influence multiple times in hotel parking lot under shade. Reported to front desk and they did nothing

Again, mind your business. The front desk doesn't deal with that, not sure what you wanted them to do.

They made me to wait for cops for 6 hours in the lobby 

No they didn't. You chose to wait.

I asked for proof and they said sorry that is what it is we cannot show you anything

Most businesses will not allow customers to view surveillance footage. It's a privacy issue.

Hotel manager even didn't meet with me after this incident.

You are not a paying customer. The manager doesn't care about your issues.

Either someone was billing Schneider and actually were not supposed to be served that, or Schneider really cannot afford a decent man's meal for its trainees abd better to reconsider if they really want/need more employees.

I'm surprised they didn't name you King of Schneider. You know so much more than everybody else. Did you try explaining it to them like they're 5 years old?

you literally pay for your own daily food and commuting!!

The horror!!

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

In the first paragraph he said he called them every 3 hours for 3 days. Right there i went hmmm

wtf-2.gif wtf.gif

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

In the first paragraph he said he called them every 3 hours for 3 days. Right there i went hmmm

wtf-2.gif wtf.gif

Imagine "The Great" waiting in a dock for more than an hour.

rofl-3.gif

Don's Comment
member avatar

No, everyone will not go through the same at Schneider as you, unless they too have a sense of entitlement. Get this through t your thick head. Trucking companies are not here to serve your every whim and demand. You work for them; they don't work for you. I have seen posts from some real thumb suckers, and you are close to being the biggest. My encouraging words? Get out of trucking.

Ok everyone, enough for here as my post get deleted because someone feel so. The point of this post was letting those applying to Schneider in Phoenix AZ know what they wil go thru. If they are desperate enough to be ok with it, I wish them good luck. For the rest of you guys here, I hope you respect your profession a bit more. Do not settle for any and every crap just because you are a trucker, you are tough, you are the real man. Do not assume that everyone needs to go thru the same pain as yours, to be an awesome trucker like "you". As long as majority of you don't change your mindset, this career gonna be looked down by others and you will be treated like a rescue from homeless shelter by your employer. Bye

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok everyone, enough for here as my post get deleted because someone feel so. The point of this post was letting those applying to Schneider in Phoenix AZ know what they wil go thru. If they are desperate enough to be ok with it, I wish them good luck. For the rest of you guys here, I hope you respect your profession a bit more. Do not settle for any and every crap just because you are a trucker, you are tough, you are the real man. Do not assume that everyone needs to go thru the same pain as yours, to be an awesome trucker like "you". As long as majority of you don't change your mindset, this career gonna be looked down by others and you will be treated like a rescue from homeless shelter by your employer. Bye

We do respect our profession. We've also EARNED the respect of our companies to be treated like rockstars. Nobody here claims the industry is perfect. It definitely has its negatives. The same could be said for every line of work. Most drivers that actively participate in this forum are team players. They understand sometimes you get less than ideal loads/treatment. Many times you're getting extra money thrown your way because your DM knows what they're asking sucks. One of the biggest problems in the industry in my opinion is training. Most drivers that SHOULD be training have no interest in it. Why? Attitudes like yours. I went back and forth for quite some time about training, and I'm in a daycab. If I have a trainee that gets on my nerves it's only 12 to 14 hours a day I gotta deal with them! Ultimately I've chosen to start training on a as needed basis but I'm not too eager. The extra $3 /hr my company offers isn't worth the added stress of potentially having a know it all that's trying to change the company before they fully understand why things work the way they do. And your rant about the food being bad? I learned at the early age when somebody offers you something you express your gratitude even if you don't necessarily care for it. Maybe one day you can learn a lesson or two about respect.

For anybody considering a career at Schneider please ignore this members gripes. No company is perfect but as you can see he clearly dug his own hole. He spent more time focused on how to change their program than doing as he's being instructed to get through training. Being a problematic student/employee is a sure fire way to get sent home. At most companies if you're struggling and show interest they will spend the time and resources into helping you improve. If you spend your time like RTG did you'll find yourself finding your own transportation home with your belongings.

I don't give two S***s what anybody thinks of my profession. It provides my family a very nice life financially. If someone wants to look down on me that's cool, but I'm laughing all the way to the bank. Not too many jobs you can make $100k within a couple years with no degree and relatively low stress. I go into work do my job and don't get bothered by anyone and go home to my wonderful family. No boss looking over my shoulder questioning everything I do. I'm left to do my job but have a dozen numbers I can call at the office if I need assistance.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar
I don't give two S***s what anybody thinks of my profession. It provides my family a very nice life financially

-Right there! Agreed!

I learned at the early age when somebody offers you something you express your gratitude even if you don't necessarily care for it

-Humility; thanks for the reminder of its importance.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm guessing millennial. I've hired and fired too many of them to count. A sense of entitlement only works in our soft educational system and mommy and daddy's basement, the real world crushes it.

We regularly have to hook and disconnect trailers in 115 degree heat, sometimes fix them, the weather doesn't care about our feelings on it, just part of the job. Good workout too.

If you can't deal with homeless and scarry people in training, you'll never survive some of the truck stops that we frequent. Try delivering in some of the cities we do.

If you can't stay in your lane, mind your own business and stay situatitionally aware, you're liable to mouth off to someone and get beat like a drum for it.

I honestly see a softer career as a better fit for the op. Something that doesn't require thought, work ethics, humility, common sense and a willingness to close the mouth and open the ears.

The beatings will continue until the student is willing to learn.

Gaz 's Comment
member avatar

Lawyer, for sure.

And paying your way through an American law school is probably easier than getting a CDL right now.

I honestly see a softer career as a better fit for the op. Something that doesn't require thought, work ethics, humility, common sense and a willingness to close the mouth and open the ears.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I don't give two S***s what anybody thinks of my profession. It provides my family a very nice life financially

double-quotes-end.png

-Right there! Agreed!

double-quotes-start.png

I learned at the early age when somebody offers you something you express your gratitude even if you don't necessarily care for it

double-quotes-end.png

-Humility; thanks for the reminder of its importance.

Indeed, times ten. Absolutely. I can remember, as a young child being raised in, with, and around, MANY cultures and communities. We were served foods of so many vast arrays, and we accepted...with gratitude. New York taught me many facets of humility. As did, Florida.

If I EVER complained about what type of chicken I was served, it would be promptly removed. I would be left to eat my peas or greenbeans (or collard greens/turnip greens, depending...) and/or my hummus ..... and that dratted chicken, would be my breakfast the next morning. Every. Single. Time. So, there weren't many times I'd refused. It sucks to be hungry.

I'm guessing millennial. I've hired and fired too many of them to count. A sense of entitlement only works in our soft educational system and mommy and daddy's basement, the real world crushes it.

We regularly have to hook and disconnect trailers in 115 degree heat, sometimes fix them, the weather doesn't care about our feelings on it, just part of the job. Good workout too.

If you can't deal with homeless and scarry people in training, you'll never survive some of the truck stops that we frequent. Try delivering in some of the cities we do.

If you can't stay in your lane, mind your own business and stay situatitionally aware, you're liable to mouth off to someone and get beat like a drum for it.

I honestly see a softer career as a better fit for the op. Something that doesn't require thought, work ethics, humility, common sense and a willingness to close the mouth and open the ears.

The beatings will continue until the student is willing to learn.

Very well said, Davy. Great observations. Said poster might fare better obtaining employment as a cashier or lot attendant at a truck stop; a lumper; and/or as I'd mentioned before ... SOME TIME SERVING THE COUNTRY and gaining respect for this profession, all the while having the opportunity to obtain his CDL.

I'm saying this with sincerity. It would land this young lad a new perspective, and perhaps a new lease on life. I'm not going to EVEN mention the draft(s) but there WERE advantages. Kids HAD to grow up. Boys 2 Men wasn't just a 'boy band.' It was a reality.

I'll leave that there.

Peace, guys!

~ Anne (& Tom ) ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Lawyer, for sure.

And paying your way through an American law school is probably easier than getting a CDL right now.

Please explain this comment, Gaz.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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