Two Right Turn Lanes....

Topic 20598 | Page 6

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Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

Section 2 of the ' Texas Commercial Motor Vehicle - Drivers Handbook '.

Section 2.7.6 - 'Space for Turns' : No information for double turn lanes turning right, but it does say to keep trailer as close to the curb as possible to keep vehicles from trying to pass you on the right.

Left Turns with double turn lanes : There is a diagram on page 2-18 (Figure 2.14). It says, "If there are two turning lanes, always take the right turn lane. Don't start on the inside lane because you may have to swing right to make the turn. Drivers on your left can be more readily seen. See Figure 2.14"

So, at least one of them is cleared up.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

The best way to turn either left or right has never been in debate. The issue I had attempted to point out is that some states, during testing have you make these crazy 2 lane right hand turns from the inside lane.

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

ATA Training Video from 1991 - Safety Brief Right Turns

That is a helpful video as far as it goes, but it doesn't address the multiple right turn lane issue that is the subject of this thread.

The multiple turn lane treatment will need to vary a bit depending on the design of the intersection. But what I normally do is initially get in the right lane but as I approach the intersection I move the tractor into the outer lane, leaving the trailer tandems in the right lane. I turn using the outer lane but keeping the wheels close enough to the curb that a car can't get by. This usually lets me complete the turn quickly, only briefly blocking multiple lanes. It insures that I won't hit anything, including a 4 wheeler, on the right side, gives me room to avoid any obstacles, and lets me see what is on the left if anyone tries to sneak up there. I've been doing this for several months now and it works like a charm. If for some reason I could not do this, I'd do the whole thing from the outer lane as Brett described.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Old School's Comment
member avatar
what I normally do is initially get in the right lane but as I approach the intersection I move the tractor into the outer lane, leaving the trailer tandems in the right lane. I turn using the outer lane but keeping the wheels close enough to the curb that a car can't get by. This usually lets me complete the turn quickly, only briefly blocking multiple lanes. It insures that I won't hit anything, including a 4 wheeler, on the right side, gives me room to avoid any obstacles, and lets me see what is on the left if anyone tries to sneak up there. I've been doing this for several months now and it works like a charm. If for some reason I could not do this, I'd do the whole thing from the outer lane as Brett described.

Dave, there are a lot of problems with doing it that way. The whole design of that multiple turn lane is because there is going to be a lot of traffic in that area. The design is to help move things along. By taking the outer lane you are already keeping anyone from going around you on your blind side. While making a safe turn like that, people can be moving along on your inner side without any fear of you crushing them. I don't see any advantage to your approach, but can see some serious issues developing that you have been fortunate enough to not have experienced yet.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I don't see any advantage to your approach, but can see some serious issues developing that you have been fortunate enough to not have experienced yet.

I agree. In fact I believe that's dangerous as can be.

Think about this for a moment. On the simplest level, what causes multi-vehicle accidents? Someone did something unpredictable. Simple as that. Maybe a car ran a red light and plowed into you. If you knew they were going to do that you would have avoided it. Maybe someone falls asleep at the wheel, crosses the centerline, and hits you head on. If you had known they were going to do that, you would have avoided it.

So if there are two right hand turn lanes and you start in one lane and then move off into the other, who could possibly know what the heck you're doing? No one can predict where you're going to go next or what strategy you're taking. No one would have guessed you would start in one lane and then take over the next lane also. You're not following any lines on the road. You're not trying to work in unison with the traffic around you. You're just totally doing your own thing and it's highly unpredictable.

Not only that, but you're going to have a blind spot on your left while you're doing that, and it's going to be while you're wandering into someone else's lane unexpectedly. At some point you're going to have to have faith that they recognize what you're doing and they stop to let you take over their lane before they wind up in a bad spot in front of your tandems.

Take the outside lane, the one with the bigger turn radius.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett says:

... you're going to have a blind spot on your left while you're doing that, and it's going to be while you're wandering into someone else's lane unexpectedly.

Take a look at my comment on page 1 here. It's for a left turn, but the same experience can be had for the right turn we're talking about here. I blocked the lane on my blind side, scared the driver waiting on the inside of the turn, and nobody knew what I was trying to do.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Dave wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

ATA Training Video from 1991 - Safety Brief Right Turns

double-quotes-end.png

That is a helpful video as far as it goes, but it doesn't address the multiple right turn lane issue that is the subject of this thread.

The multiple turn lane treatment will need to vary a bit depending on the design of the intersection. But what I normally do is initially get in the right lane but as I approach the intersection I move the tractor into the outer lane, leaving the trailer tandems in the right lane. I turn using the outer lane but keeping the wheels close enough to the curb that a car can't get by. This usually lets me complete the turn quickly, only briefly blocking multiple lanes. It insures that I won't hit anything, including a 4 wheeler, on the right side, gives me room to avoid any obstacles, and lets me see what is on the left if anyone tries to sneak up there. I've been doing this for several months now and it works like a charm. If for some reason I could not do this, I'd do the whole thing from the outer lane as Brett described.

Dave I totally agree with Brett, Old School and Errol on this. Your approach is unfortunately a potential recipe for disaster and a citation waiting to be written. There is no way it is without risk, especially in heavy, urban traffic, complete with impatient commuters rushing home to suburbia.

I highly recommend (if you haven't done so), reading all the replies in this thread and rethink what you are doing.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

I've learned a lot from reading this whole thread, and am amending my approach immediately. I really appreciate this excellent forum.

Thanks especially to Brett, Old School, and G-Town.

Dave

double-quotes-start.png

what I normally do is initially get in the right lane but as I approach the intersection I move the tractor into the outer lane, leaving the trailer tandems in the right lane. I turn using the outer lane but keeping the wheels close enough to the curb that a car can't get by. This usually lets me complete the turn quickly, only briefly blocking multiple lanes. It insures that I won't hit anything, including a 4 wheeler, on the right side, gives me room to avoid any obstacles, and lets me see what is on the left if anyone tries to sneak up there. I've been doing this for several months now and it works like a charm. If for some reason I could not do this, I'd do the whole thing from the outer lane as Brett described.

double-quotes-end.png

Dave, there are a lot of problems with doing it that way. The whole design of that multiple turn lane is because there is going to be a lot of traffic in that area. The design is to help move things along. By taking the outer lane you are already keeping anyone from going around you on your blind side. While making a safe turn like that, people can be moving along on your inner side without any fear of you crushing them. I don't see any advantage to your approach, but can see some serious issues developing that you have been fortunate enough to not have experienced yet.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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