Fingerprinting Loads (that Is - DRIVER UNLOADS)

Topic 14787 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Aside from the obvious - Dollar Store type dedicated accounts, where every load is a "driver unload".

How often is, say a Prime Reefer Driver (for example) going to run into a situation where they have to unload a trailer themselves?

Reason I'm asking...

As some of y'all know - just went through a hernia surgery that escalated from a "minor 2 hour outpatient procedure" (for 3 hernias) to a 5 hour (6 hernias) 4-day hospital stay.

I'm healing well, but there's still a question as to how much I'm going to be able to handle weight-wise - and I'm certainly not going to consider a position where I've gotta drag 30 pallets of goods off a trailer. I've still got another month before the surgeon will write me a "full duty release", and probably another month after that before I'm fully healed.

So - how often have our members here, actually had to fingerprint a load?

Not talking about a "live load" - where you have to wait for someone to load/unload the box.

Rick

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C. S.'s Comment
member avatar

I run dry van about 99% of the time and have never had to unload. I trained exclusively on reefer and out of the twenty or so loads I did during that time I never had to unload, either. The closest I've ever come is having a few cases of refused freight that need to be taken off the trailer. With that said, I would explain your situation to your DM when you get out on the road and ask that you be excluded from any loads where they know driver unload is required. That is reasonable accommodation and any company should be fine with it.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I'm a Swift reefer driver, 4 months solo (6 months out if you include time with trainers) and never had to touch a load. Never heard other drivers in my division mention having to do it either. One time I got to a grocery store and there were not enough people working to help me unload. At the time, I didn't know I could offer to unload myself, so the store called someone to come to work and unload me. Typically, we are not even allowed to unload for insurance reasons unless specifically asked to by Swift or the receiver. If I see the receiver is understaffed, I can offer to unload. At least, that's what I was told over Qualcomm.

But, to answer your question, being required to unload your own trailer as an otr driver (with Swift, unsure of other companies) is practically unheard of.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rick asks:

So - how often have our members here, actually had to fingerprint a load?

I have never "had" to. However on occasion I have helped to restack a really bad leaning pallet or a spilled pallet or give the unloader a push if using a manual pallet jack. I believe it helps establish some mutual respect, common ground with the unloaders.

I am not required to do any of it, in fact I am fairly sure Swift would prefer if I left any lifting up to the store personnel.

Chris K.'s Comment
member avatar

W Stevens (2005) I assisted in unloading plants one time. Other than that it was lumpers or dock workers.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

We always use lumpers. We send in for a po number then write an EFS check.

But then again we only run DC to DC. Delivering to individual stores you might not have lumpers you can hire.

If I were you, I would talk to your DM and explain the situation. Since driver unloads are so rare they should be able to keep you away from anywhere that you would have to unload.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I have only had 1 time where I had to unload I was delivering chocolate to a place that makes those fancy chocolate covered Apple's and I had to pull 2 pallets off the truck. I used their pallet jack and took them off. The only other time I've ever had to move anything was when a customer refused some product and put it back on the trailer on a pallet. I think the pallet weighed more than the product lol

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I've never touched freight. I have had to watch them load and count the pallets. But prime pays for lumpers to unload. I think this is supposed to be a choice and you can unload and get paid if you want.... but I haven't met a driver yet who choses.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I've only been doing dry van for a couple months now, I'm with a small company and I've only once had to restack a pallet that the product slid off pallet. I went over Mt Hood crazy curves, guess I took one to fast, lol.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

Solo? Never. Maybe to toss a rejected pallet into a dumpster (if Prime says to dispose of course).

If you run team the only loads that you would unload yourself is flowers at Prime. As far as I know no one runs flowers solo.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More