Worries Regarding Acquiring A Cdl

Topic 24764 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

“PLEASE.....DO NOT give any of your hard earned cash to a private Trucking School. DO look into Company Sponsored Training.”

Really? The private school I graduated from had three recently retired Schneider drivers as instructors. Not all companies offered training in my area.

I have just as much respect for drivers regardless of who they trained with.

Thanks to tuition reimbursement, I’d say my experience was as good as any company-sponsored school.

I respect everyone’s opinions on which path to CDL is best. But there are many variables when choosing and it just seems disingenuous to flat-out tell people not to go to a private school.

Steve... she has several MVR issues. She may be accepted to a private school, or Communuty Coljege only to be turned down by any company willing to train entry level drivers.

My reply to her is relevant and in no way disingenuous.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
it just seems disingenuous to flat-out tell people not to go to a private school.

Why would that seem disingenuous? We believe the paid CDL training programs are a better option than private schools for a long list of reasons. There are a lot of things to consider. Have you even read this article to see where we're coming from?

Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training Over Private CDL Training

If you think private schools are a better option then I would say you don't understand the big picture very well, because to me it's not even debatable which is the better option.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Although now that I have stated it's a college course, is it still preferable to go through a company?

“PLEASE.....DO NOT give any of your hard earned cash to a private Trucking School. DO look into Company Sponsored Training.”

Really? The private school I graduated from had three recently retired Schneider drivers as instructors. Not all companies offered training in my area.

I have just as much respect for drivers regardless of who they trained with.

Thanks to tuition reimbursement, I’d say my experience was as good as any company-sponsored school.

I respect everyone’s opinions on which path to CDL is best. But there are many variables when choosing and it just seems disingenuous to flat-out tell people not to go to a private school.

My post was not to knock private schools. The OP has some Motor Vehicle related issues that could prevent many Companies from hiring him. With Company Sponsored Training he would know if he is hirable before laying out any cash. That is all. I am not anti private school.

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar
I respect everyone’s opinions on which path to CDL is best. But there are many variables when choosing and it just seems disingenuous to flat-out tell people not to go to a private school.

And that is certainly a respectable option when people have great driving records, physicals, and no criminal background issues. But for people with questionable employment potential, it truly can be a waste of time and money. How many have we seen here who go to orienatation and get sent home? "But my CDL school said it was fine I had 2 DUIs, a felony, and a failed drug test!"

Calling the recruiters to ask questions about the background issues sounds logical. Go from there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

1. I agree; disingenuous was the wrong word. I apologize. 2. I never said private schools are better. 3. Since it’s not even debatable, I won’t attempt to persuade you. However, I’m grateful that when I came to this site, considering all options was encouraged.

Thanks.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Specific example of the difference between local community college and Prime training:

Community College CDL A class is 5 weeks and costs $5000

Tuition reimbursement from Prime is "up to $1,500." So net out of pocket equals $3,500.

If you come from a private school, Prime requires 40,000 miles TNT and $600 per week for the first 5 weeks. $700 thereafter.

Prime CDL training is 3 to 4 weeks and you get a $250 bonus if you pass the test the first time.

TNT is 30,000 miles and you get paid a minimum of $700 per week during TNT.

Drive for one year with Prime and it only costs $155.

So by my math, $3,500, plus $250, plus extra $500 ($100 per week for five weeks), less the $155 equals more than $4,000 extra in my pocket. That does not even take into consideration the 1 to 2 weeks earlier that I begin TNT and the 10,000 miles less of TNT, which means starting solo driving and more money sooner.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

One thing most people don't realize, because I don't talk about it much, is that for the past 12 years I've spoken regularly with people throughout the industry. Recruiters, training program directors, private school owners, safety managers, company owners, and people at all levels throughout the industry. So I've had the opportunity to discuss at length the various training programs that exists, what works and what doesn't, and why.

I also know that the paid CDL training programs have grown tremendously in recent years and they continue to grow as private trucking schools continue to go out of business.

We've also had well over 10 million visits to this website over the years and we've followed the journey of thousands of drivers as they've either gotten their trucking career off to a great start, or failed to do so.

There are a lot of very simple and logical reasons for this evolution in training that's taking place, which I've summed up in my article Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training Over Private CDL Training.

To speak to your points directly, we've never said there's only one way to do things. What we've said is that there's a preferred way, and that's what we encourage people to do - take the path that will give incoming drivers the best chance at success.

We've also never said anything about the respect a driver gets for the type of training they've chosen. I have no idea what would make you even mention it.

Since it’s not even debatable, I won’t attempt to persuade you

Please, if you have information that will help people get their career off to a great start then please share it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Respectfully, this is what you said, “because to me it's not even debatable which is the better option.”

That’s why I said what I said.

I believe company-sponsored CDL school is a better option when and where it exists. But for me, private school was better because;

1. My preferred company didn’t offer it.

2. The closest community college offering it would’ve meant more than six months before I’d be earning money.

3. The combination of private school, and the company’s short Orientation, meant I was able to go solo in less than eight weeks, thus earning full pay and no team driving with a trainer.

My path isn’t best for everyone. But it has served me and my employer well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
no team driving with a trainer

You never went out with a trainer? You got your CDL at private school and immediately went solo?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I went through a real good private school, while it worked for me it isnt for everyone, especially those with spoty records as it can be a waste of money.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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