Truck Comparison

Topic 24952 | Page 2

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Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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I have a question for ya'll. When I was in a 2016 fl I got 7.5 mpg with a 13 sp. When I got into the 2018 fl I get 6.2/6.3mpg. So I'm not convinced that the autoshift is better in fuel economy than the manual. Plus I could go 68 mph in 2016.

Raptor

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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When I got into the 2018 fl I get 6.2/6.3mpg. So I'm not convinced that the autoshift is better in fuel economy than the manual.

That is exactly why Old Dominion doesnt buy autos yet, the fuel mileage tends to be worse and the autos tend to have more problems.

Rob T.'s Comment
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With my current company we have daycab FL, internationals, KW, but a majority are volvos. The volvos are by far my favorite to drive. Turn radius is much better than other brands we have. Internationals seem a lot more cramped and not sealed very well. I'm sure the rubber seals on windows are wearing away but in the 4 internationals I've driven of ours all had the same problem. Gets noisy going down the highway from the wind and gets chilly quickly. KW is nice but the mirrors seemed so small. FL mirrors are a little small as well, and I'm not too big on the shifter being a little knob on the steering wheel. Either way I'll drive whatever is assigned to me as I'm not the one paying for it.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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When I drove tankers they had all Pete's. It climbed hills and mountains a lot better than my freightliner. I think the companies buy the smallest powertrains. I understand the costs are better with fl, but at least put a better powertrain in them. And definately go back to a standard tranny. If you can't drive a stick than find another line of work. Or master it. You didn't just wake up when you were learning to walk and start running. It takes practice. My only positive thing to say about autoshift is when I'm in traffic. No other positive response from me. Sorry G-town..........

Raptor

G-Town's Comment
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Raptor gnawing on the bone...

And definately go back to a standard tranny. If you can't drive a stick than find another line of work. Or master it. You didn't just wake up when you were learning to walk and start running. It takes practice. My only positive thing to say about autoshift is when I'm in traffic. No other positive response from me. Sorry G-town..........

Raptor

Offering an edict like “learn to shift or find another line of work”? Just plain silly considering the majority of hiring companies are taking a path in direct opposition to that train if thought and our mission here is to assist and encourage newbies.

Many things affect average MPG including the driver’s experience with auto-shift technology, weight, terrain, and wind.

With all due respect Raptor, you haven’t been using it that long, I average 7.0 and always run heavy at or above 40k in very hilly terrain, in urban NE Regional traffic.

Anyone reading this for the first time, please consider that part of our job as a professional driver is to master the tools we are given by our employers including the transmissions installed in our trucks.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Tractor Man's Comment
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Raptor, exactly how fast do you need to go up a hill, or on flat highway for that matter. How much HORSEPOWER do you think you need. Swift gives us time on all of our loads taking all things into consideration. I am still able to drive 3000 miles in a week if I need to. I prefer to stay around 2500. I am just not in that big of a hurry. Also, your comment about "learn to drive a manual or find another line of work" was uncalled for.

wtf.gif

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

BTW Raptor. In your first few weeks solo, you have managed to follow your qualcomm blindly into a few situations, and managed to back into a car because you didn't GOAL! You may want to consider working on some of those issues before you get too worked up over Truck Manufacturers, Transmissions, Speed and Horsepower!

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Im diggin my brand new international with cummins and 13 sp auto shift ive gotten used to the manual shifting for hills and i am impressed with its power on hills id say it outpulls a dd15 anyday very comfy although fuel economy is crappy 6.2 mpg but its not super important to my company. Also something noone mentioned was the fact that to order new trucks you could be on a 6-12 month backorder list so they may just go with whats available first

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Also, when it comes to insulation, the International is sooooo much better. In the FL I used to shove blankets down around the bunk and press my jacket against the driver door while driving through winter areas. In my first FL, snow flurries were falling on my head in WY. Air would come up through the window and lock controls, and the APU a/c and bunk heater could never keep up in extreme temps. Another thing is the FL leaks. badly. The marker lights would crack or leak and need replacing and the windshields leak a lot. Didnt have any of that with the Internationals.

Many things affect average MPG including the driver’s experience with auto-shift technology, weight, terrain, and wind.

With all due respect Raptor, you haven’t been using it that long, I average 7.0 and always run heavy at or above 40k in very hilly terrain, in urban NE Regional traffic.

And you think that number is good? That number is horrible, even for my manuals. And both of these Internationals get worse fuel mileage than my manuals.

Both my manual Cascadias averaged 9.2 to 9.5 mpg loaded. I could get up to 13mpg empty. On my heaviest loads (yes i do 46k beer loads, and meat loads, potatoes and more all through the mountains cities, and Northeast as well) my heaviest loads, my manual Cascadias never went below 8.3 i got used to a very good fuel bonus (up to $250 per week). With that said, I already stated earlier that my Cascadias were much lighter, so that may be why the best I have had with the autos is 8.3 Still, the autos best is equivolent with my manuals worst. That is not exactly a ringing endorsement for fuel economy.

As for a "driver's experience with auto shift technology".... according to the promotional videos, that is unneccesary. The newer trucks (i dont know your year) are equipped with topographical mapping. The truck is supposed to already know the terrain and be prepared to handle it. Therefore, driver manipulation is minimal. My truck even knows the weight of my drives and makes adjustments for speed and grades based on that.

Anyone reading this for the first time, please consider that part of our job as a professional driver is to master the tools we are given by our employers including the transmissions installed in our trucks.

True, but we are still entitled to our own opinions. I prefer a manual as well. No one is going to brow beat me into preferring it, or believing the mpg is better. Raptor is entitled to his opinion.

Fedex told my friend they prefer O/Os in autos simply for being able to fill the seats easier. Prospective drivers, especially younger ones, are intimidated by manuals because the only ones we still have are in sports cars. Most drivers below 35 have never driven one. I'm 44, I never drove a manual before the CDL and yes, it was intimidating, but I did it.

The veteran drivers grumbled and had me terrified of not being able to control the auto going downhill. I drive a lot of mountains, especially in winter. What I found out is that these drivers werent thinking. Its about the rpms holding the jakes and downshifting to the proper gear. Or downshifting lower if not using the brakes. They just never took the time to learn their trucks.

And yeah, now I am going to sound sexist, so sue me. I think a big part of the auto vs manual debate is the male ego/ testosterone. I want a truck that drives safely and I can make money in. For.right now, I made more money in the manuals due to better fuel mileage which gave me better bonuses.

Of course...with all that said, Prime is the slowest fleet on earth, so perhaps that is why our mpgs are better. Prime is always telling us 56 to 58 mpg gives the best results although most of us never do that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy,

Your posts remind me of our primary marksmanship instructor in basic training. In succession, he asked 1) who are my hunters (many hands raised) 2) who shoots occasionally (a few hands raised) 3) who has only shot a gun once or twice (a few hands raised) and 4) who have never shot a gun in their life (a couple of hands raised). In response to the last group he said "those are my experts." The rationale, is people who have never done something before, don't have to unlearn bad habits. Rather, the first time they learn it, they learn to do it the right way.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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