Roehl Transport & Forced Dispatch - New CDL Graduate Needs More Information

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Eric S.'s Comment
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Hi,

Thanks for this forum and the great information.

I just graduated from CDL school in Southern California and got my CDL last week - ready to find a company with good training!

Something I don't remember learning about is "forced dispatch" which I saw in the review of Roelh Transport on this site. I was considering applying to Roehl but see they are a forced-dispatch company. Can some of you explain exactly what this is? It doesn't sound appealing from the Google description.

Also, any recommendations of trucking companies with good driving training programs for recent graduates would really be appreciated. I'd really like to eventually end up working regional out of Southern California - at least that seems to sound the best pay-wise and home-time wise.

Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Jamie's Comment
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Basically just means you can't turn down any loads, if they assigned it to you, you have to deliver it rather if you like where it's going or not.

Old School's Comment
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Hello Eric, and welcome to our forum!

Personally I don't think being "force dispatched" is a bad thing at all. Here's an article about it that should help you understand it. If after reading it, you have more questions or concerns, then feel free to ask us. We will be glad to help you with it.

Should Drivers Work For Companies That Are Force Dispatched?

C T.'s Comment
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Basically it means the company sends you a work assignment on your computer thingy and you get it done. There's no refusing loads. They send you something and it's gotta get done. Keep in mind, that if you went to a company that wasn't forced dispatch and made it a habit of refusing loads, you could find yourself sitting at a truck stop for a while. Your best bet as a rookie is to show them you're willing to run and prove yourself a safe and reliable driver. That will pay off in the future wherever you end up.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Welcome to Trucking Truth, Eric! We have "tons" of information for new drivers here.

On the top left of the page there is a three bar menu drop down. Click there and follow things that look interesting or informative. Also there's a search box right below the menu button. If you put "forced dispatch" in there you will get a list like this.

Specifically, "forced dispatch" means your next trip is not optional. For most drivers, heading to Savannah, GA, or Las Cruces, NM, is no big deal. But many drivers really don't want to go to the old and crowded roads around Boston and New York. In some companies, if you get a trip to New Haven, CT, you can turn it down. But somebody has to do it! So, this time it's you! "Forced Dispatch".

Keep this in mind: the DMs know these destinations are unpopular, and just might get you a "good" run later. Also, if you get picky about where you are willing to go, your DM might not waste the time getting you any run at all for a few days!

Bottom line, I'd not worry about being forced to go somewhere. You will probably never have to do this: Truck Making Tight Turn on Residential Street

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bruce K.'s Comment
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Hi Eric. I don't like the term "forced dispatch" It makes the company sound like they are totalitarian mini-states, which they aren't. In every other profession, it's just called "doing your job".

It took me awhile to understand the difference between dispatch and load boards. If you are a company driver you will be dispatched, unlike an independent driver. This is not a bad thing at all. Your company dispatch may avoid sending you on very difficult routes when you are a rookie so you can build up your skills before you get assigned to congested areas. This was the case with me at Schneider.

Old School has posted a number of times about his great relationship with his dispatcher. Because he has a long term track record of "getting the job done", his dispatcher gives him great assignments. You will never hear any of the experienced drivers complain about the so-called "forced dispatch".

So, don't let that influence your choice of a company to drive for. Besides, rookies like us don't have the knowledge and experience to pick and choose loads wisely. That's why they pay dispatchers to guide us.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
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If you’re in southern CA, you may not be in the Roehl hiring area. The majority of their operations are east of the Mississippi River.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Roehl has a flatbed division in so cal. Was in Fontana unless they moved it. Roehl is a good company, don’t get hung up on the forced dispatch issue. We all have our likes and dislikes, but we still have to do our job. There are alot of factors that go into dispatch assignments, so just be thankful they are getting you miles and home on time.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Question I had RE: "forced dispatch" is "how does that play out for rookies?"

I get the concept and see both sides of the issue. As a Noob I am looking to have the ability to learn to do this and hopefully to perform at a high level. My objective was always to find an opportunity to succeed. I assume Forced Dispatch is still tempered with the employer not intentionally "setting up a rookie to fail." How does this really play out in the real world? (I can't see a DM intentionally sending a rookie to a place they know will be a nightmare early on. Or is that being overly optimistic?).

In my brief tine training with J.B. Hunt I got get to see some trickey Targets*. But I think they would not have sent me there right away as a new solo...

* One had almost no place to drop the trailers (double drop). Docks were right along a busy street with no truck parking, Municipality hates trucks and truckers... Virtually impossible to do legally for a pro! But the truck and trailer actually DO fit in the streets around there!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

Forced dispatch is a bad term. If you worked in a store and your boss said dusting the shelves is one of your jobs, you would have to do that every day.

Forced dispatch means here is you next work assignment. The company finds you loads with the goal of making money. Money for you and therefore the company. The more they keep you running the better for everyone.

New drivers don't know the freight lanes or where higher paying freight is. I have a friend who owns his own truck and is an independent contractor with CFI. He is not forced dispatched, yet he takes every load they give him and he keeps running.

Don't let the term forced dispatch play in your decision. Good luck to you.

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