Thoughts On PAM Transports Class Action Lawsuit?

Topic 25949 | Page 2

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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You will never turn a bum into a good worker, but you can turn a good worker into a bum.

One thing I hated about my old union job was that we all made the same money. I would bust out doing the job of two people and my coworker would be reading magazines or talking on the phone. Management didnt care how the work got done, so i was used. It got old after a few years.

Now i work hard i get paid, i work harder i get paid better.

Make it an hourly thing and at $800 a week, i am insulted. I made that my rookie year when our cpm was much lower $116 per day vs my $250 per day... uh.. i like the way I have it now thank you.

They are not considering layover and breakdown pay. Watch those disappear. If i am in a hotel now, i get paid waiting for my truck. If i got paid by the hour, i wouldnt. The week i changed trucks, I got $2400 in layover and bonuses without having to drive a single mile. That means all of our bonus money will disappear, and add ons so the bums can get paid more.

Also consider, PAM, CR England and the other companies mentioned in a few of these PAM articles hire felons and those with DMV , drug and other problems. As second chance companies they do start at lower wages because those they hire may not have been hireable elswhere. They are probably also paying out more money in insurance if they arent self insured (i dont know if they are).

So people who should have appreciated they were given a chance when other companies wouldnt accept them...and could have worked a year then found a better paying company... are *****ing they arent treated fairly. Booo Hoo

Sorry. I was just aruging on Twitter with idiots who want me to pay their debts. So perhaps i am in a harsh mood. I worked my butt off to pay my bills off. And these other drivers who are so unhappy need to perform better then find better companies if they dont like the one they are with.

And I mean all companies will have things drivers do or dont like. I love Prime but wish there were more dedicated near me, and I didnt have to give up my FM to take one. That is huge to me. But Im not going to cry and sue to keep my FM and get home more.

Everytime people fight for more pay, something disappears to offset the costs. Look at Amazon, pay went up and benefits went out. I dont want to pay a ton of money for my benefits...all included dental vision life disability etc.... i pay $50 per week. That will go up too so that bums get paid more.

I hate some people.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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You’re on Twitter?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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You’re on Twitter?

Only to spew some logic and i try not to argue directly.... but today... well... they sound just like the PAM drivrrs and the crybaby Youtubers

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

You’re on Twitter?

double-quotes-end.png

Only to spew some logic and i try not to argue directly.... but today... well... they sound just like the PAM drivrrs and the crybaby Youtubers

NO WAY! Say it ain’t so!rofl-3.gif

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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It seems that I used to hear that when I did AG hauling, we were 25% of the load. Kind of like piece work. Both of the ones I worked for had other benefits to go along with it. We could some dedicated runs. Some paid better than others of course. When the President of one of the companies had a company picnic and spent a few thousand on it, and overheard some of the drivers say all he can offered is ribs and tri-tip what a cheap b******. Next year we didn't get the picnic and he took the dedicated accounts away. So you can't expect an owner of a company to put forth an effort, and have it thrown back in your face. I'm happy where I'm at, and I'm driving a 2019 truck. I get lots of refer miles. So what's to complain about. That as soon as I agreed to work for Swift he didn't give a $20,000 bonus on day one? I hate going to the terminals, all you hear is people complaining about that they aren't given many miles.

Anyway, complainers will be with us always.

The judge in my opinion was totally wrong for agreeing to do this favoring these guys.

Raptor

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Army 's Comment
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I remember starting wages at taco johns in the early 90’s was $3.85. I thought I was rich lol

Rob D.'s Comment
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“It’s worth noting the case only stands for the proposition that carriers must pay their drivers $7.25 per hour,” said the lead attorney representing the drivers, Justin Swidler. “Under the FLSA, hourly wages are considered over the course of a whole workweek. This means that while carriers nationwide should understand their minimum wage exposure, companies which pay reasonable wages to their drivers have no reason for concern.”

If it takes you 140 hours of total on-duty time to log 2500 miles a week (7 days) at $.41 per mile, you are making $7.32 per hour.

BTW, the Judge only denied Pam Transport's Motion to Dismiss, which are usually denied. It is not a final decision in the case.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

If it takes you 140 hours of total on-duty time to log 2500 miles a week (7 days) at $.41 per mile, you are making $7.32 per hour.

BTW, the Judge only denied Pam Transport's Motion to Dismiss, which are usually denied. It is not a final decision in the case.

Of that "140 hours", you are only driving 110 hours (potentially).

And some of this also depends on the district the case is being tried in also. Out in Cali, courts tend to lean more towards the left - and these kind of cases take on more of a "social justice flavor", than in the more conservative states.

In most cases - OTR drivers come into this trade pretty much KNOWING that they get paid for MILES NOT TIME. Especially if they spend any time HERE, before going out on the road.

Another permutation of this is - are drivers going to get paid for all (potential) hours on duty, on a normal "40+ overtime" pay? At 140 hours "on duty" per week - 100 of those hours should (might) be "overtime".

One defense for the company - is THEIR CONTRACT with the drivers. If you sign a contract, accepting the terms of mileage pay - how do you come back and sue for hourly pay?

This also falls along the lines of LEASE OPS, that are considered "sub-contractors", suing to establish that they are EMPLOYEES and not contractors - based on the fact that they are (somewhat) "forced dispatch", and have the same responsibilities as "regular employees". Which again, is a factor of SIGNING A CONTRACT, and then seeking to CHANGE THE TERMS of the agreement.

All in all - this is one of those "harassment suits", that has the potential to screw it up for EVERYONE, if they get the wrong judge. The object is always about $$ and a SETTLEMENT - rather than changing the rules. But a bad outcome could potentially change the rules - and not in a GOOD WAY for a majority of drivers that have the potential to make WAY MORE on straight mileage by being productive & conscientious.

Rick

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

If this actually comes to pass, I think the lawyers (as always) will profit from this more so than the drivers.

Although this is an attempt to coddle the underachievers, in the end trucking will still be performance based. The best drivers will always receive top pay. And the whiners that initiated this suit, they will find something new to complain about.

Yawn.

Andy D.'s Comment
member avatar

This way of thinking with this lawsuit would be very similar to unionizing the entire trucking industry in my opinion.

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