Contract Buyout

Topic 27285 | Page 2

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Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I got my CDL from CRST. The easy part is the testing. After that the real trucker training begins. Learning all the little ins and outs. Like finding your own empty when you're in areas that have few. Or making sure you read the messages before delivering or picking up to make sure you're taking the right route. Don't be a thorn in your DMs butt.

Also they do a lot of drop and hook , which is good for a newb. A lot of FedEx, UPS, Amazon. Most of those places are pretty big and easy to navigate. Get that down in your first year before you jump ship. And before you do ask if they have anything you might want like a dedicated route. Even though they don't advertise it I know of more than one driver who ran solo on a dedicated route. But... They won't give it to you while you're still new and under contract.

Stick that first year out. I know I remember hearing everyone talking about who would get out of their contract, and how, instead of how they would work their butt off.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David Z.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks everyone I’ll stay positive and see how it goes

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I’ll stay positive and see how it goes

You can do even better. Don't just see how it goes, make it go well. There's a big difference. The company will do its part. You can count on that. They're one of the largest, most successful companies on the planet. They're a well-oiled machine. They're looking for hard-working, safe, reliable people who can keep that well-oiled machine running strong. Show them you're eager, you're motivated, you're ready to contribute to their success and you'll reap the rewards that the top tier drivers get.

Go get em!

smile.gif

Old School's Comment
member avatar

David, this is the part of trucking that only a small percentage of people really grasp, yet it's crucial to success. The distinction Brett makes is a critical and decisive action the driver must do...

Don't just see how it goes, make it go well.

Every driver you hear from who is struggling is taking the approach that says...

I’ll stay positive and see how it goes

You won't be able to stay positive by passively just looking to see how it goes. Trucking has a lot of issues. It comes with the territory. What happens to new drivers is that they transpose those issues onto their company. They lay blame for the things they struggle with as being generated by the company. It's the classic dynamic which crushes so many hopeful rookie driver's dreams.

Successful drivers attack these issues with a warrior's approach. They learn the subtle ways to deal with the things that plague other rookies. You've already had someone mention finding empty trailers. I've seen guys sit and wait for days on their dispatcher to find them an empty trailer. No professional who wants to succeed at this would do that. He'd develop his own ways and methods to keep up with where empty trailers can be found.

That's just one example of being pro-active. You learn to conduct yourself out here so that you stay at the top of the priority list. Don't let it surprise you that some drivers are treated much better than others. It's a harsh reality that many never comprehend. There's no brown-nosing involved, and there's no inexplicable favoritism shown. The reality is that driver managers recognize the people who get things accomplished with little to no oversight. Those drivers are golden. They are rewarded with work, and tons of it.

I could give you volumes of examples. Just this week we were winding down to a slower period due to the holidays, when my dispatcher called me concerning a 2,700+ mile run. I wasn't even finished with the load I was on, but he wanted to know if I'd take it. I asked him why he didn't just give it to one of the three drivers that I knew were at the plant waiting on a load. He simply said, "I'm not sure they will handle it like I know you will. It's a critical load. We can't drop the ball on this one."

That's how it works out here. You build yourself a reputation within the company. The company has already built it's reputation with it's customers. They're going to do what they can to maintain that good will. One way they accomplishe that goal is to effectively utilize the drivers who perform flawlessly.

That's your goal. Do what it takes so the coach keeps you in the game. Over achievers are highly valued in a competitive environment.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

David, I’ll add just one more thing here... your words remind me of a GM I once worked for; he was a great source for fantastic advice. See, you are already laying the groundwork for a litany of excuses when things don’t go the way you had hoped, supported by the people and/or Internet you’ve been recently listening to. To you my former GM would say, “Don’t prepare to fail, prepare to succeed.” Make it your mission NOT to bring home 500-600/wk; apply yourself, adhere to the advice Brett and Old School have given you, and be that new driver who knocks it out of the park. The name on the side of the door really doesn’t matter... all of the big companies hiring new drivers pay pretty much the same. That ‘perfect job?’ You’re not going to find it, you’re going to have to make it. Best of luck to you David... if it’s in you, you’ll do great!

Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar

David,
These last 2 posts are prime examples of the great advice and mentoring we can get on this site (as well as the others that are here). I'm not out on the road, yet, but every teaching point like these i write down in my little book of helpful things to remember and strive for.
Good luck on your new journey. Hoping you can make it a positive, great experience.
Bill R.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Been with CRST over 3 months now. It's not all that bad if you get a good co-driver!! Mine is about to get the boot....two weeks behind me and thinks he's my trainer. He can't back a lick I'm doing it all ......At least we got a 2019 truck right off the bat too

But we do run coast to coast most of the time this load we dropped was only 900 miles but it's a new customer here in Cedar Rapids. It was a critical load to be ON time.....shortest yet, usually we been doing 1800-2800 mile runs......1st time to Oregon and Seattle, blehhhh I hadn't miss nothing never being there before hahahaha RAIN

We have gotten stuck sitting a day or 2 (rare) but our DM takes care of us and pays us layover pay....Being low men on the totem pole we didn't get home for Xmas. NY'rs......playing clean up lol

Out of 64 in my class, 24 got licensed, of those over half walked away within 2 weeks, couldn't handle it. I think there are 10-12 of us so far still here. Heck, in 7 months my contract will be complete. Time flies when you're running pretty much non-stop

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Scratch2win's Comment
member avatar

It's not bad. I ran 23k miles with my trainer. Stacked almost 3k learned to back way different then nada showed me. This has been my first week after training and have been solo the whole week and ran 3k miles out the gate. My co did 90 day training so that jammed me up to run team till I get hooked with a new co. I'm in sandeigo on a reset chilling. Hang in there bro.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

It's not bad. I ran 23k miles with my trainer. Stacked almost 3k learned to back way different then nada showed me. This has been my first week after training and have been solo the whole week and ran 3k miles out the gate. My co did 90 day training so that jammed me up to run team till I get hooked with a new co. I'm in sandeigo on a reset chilling. Hang in there bro.

While you're doing the reset, you should change your experience level on the profile page, Scratch2win.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Nice thread, y'all. Hope the O/P is convinced to hang in there. Many people start out leery after they've got their papers complete with CRST due to the clause..as I've read on here. Papers everywhere, it's all about commitment, no matter whom, what, where imho.

StevoReno, congrats for sure, man. Following always.

Speaking of which.. why hasn't our 'ambassador' for CRST chimed in? Anyone..info? @MillionMiler24 I believe..... if I didn't mess up the spelling.

?!?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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