Who Is More Guilty

Topic 28544 | Page 1

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Mike B.'s Comment
member avatar

So i while my truck was being serviced in Nashville I roomed with a Western driver who was deaf. So he told me he was making a delivery and ran out of hours and his dm told him to go ahead and deliver and that he would take care of it. So the driver delivers the load going over his HOS and obviously gets called in. He does an HOS class but informs management of what his dm said and dm denies but the driver has the messages on his Qualcomm. So my question is who is more guilty in the wrong doing in this situation?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Penguin 's Comment
member avatar

The PROFESSIONAL truck driver is.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

The driver is at fault. He should of gotten the load delivered without needing to go over his hours. More than likely he wasn’t doing a very good job and his DM was sick of his crap. He’s probably there so they can help him with trip planning and managing his clock and they used the excuse of an hours of service violation to get him in. There’s always more to the story so don’t let em fool you.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

The driver is always resposible. I don’t see any reasons stated here as too why he ran out of hours, and it makes no difference. The driver should have notified his dm of the hos problem and parked. The DM should have resceduled the delivery or found another driver to relay it for on time delivery.

The driver should have refused to violate the hos and the dm should have known better, but it happens. The dm is denying it because they know it is wrong. Those qualcom messages are very important to that driver now. It proves who made the bigger mistake, in the companies eyes, however the driver is still got to clean up their mistake with the company.

This doesn’t say but I’m guessing this is a new driver. They will learn a valuable lesson here and hopefully not repeat it.

The dm has their own issues and the driver should not concern themself with that. Learn from the mistake and move on.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Every decision we make as the driver of the truck is our responsibility.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
He does an HOS class but informs management of what his dm said and dm denies but the driver has the messages on his Qualcomm.

That's bizarre. Very few DM's would put such a message on the Quallcomm. Only an inexperienced dummy would make such a mistake. There's no way to deny something and get away with it when there's an electronic record of it.

If it is as you say, they must both be rookies. I agree with the others - the driver bears the blame. He is ultimately the one making the decision.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It's always hard to analyze a scenario that probably didn't happen. Like Old School said, a dispatcher would never put a message like that over Qualcomm. It also makes no sense to have him take an HOS class if the driver knew he was breaking the rules. It's not like he didn't know the rules. Finally, why would a dispatcher deny saying something he put in the Qualcomm , knowing there's a record of it? Even rookie dispatchers know not to tell someone to break the rules over Qualcomm and then deny it.

I've had a long career of listening to fictional stories from truck drivers. I rather enjoyed it most of the time. I knew most of the stories were partly true at best, but I didn't mind. I looked at it the same way I look at going to the movies. I don't care if it's true or not. I just want it to be entertaining.

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Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I've had a long career of listening to fictional stories from truck drivers. I rather enjoyed it most of the time. I knew most of the stories were partly true at best, but I didn't mind. I looked at it the same way I look at going to the movies. I don't care if it's true or not. I just want it to be entertaining.

I love that. It's so true! Anybody who has been out here for a while develops a B.S. filter. You're gonna hear so many tales. They can be entertaining, and it's best to let them have that value without taking them as being literally true. Truckers can certainly come up with some tales.

I once got hung up on during a conversation with a former terminal manager at Knight. He called me giving me some instructions (more like a demand) concerning how I was handling a certain load. He didn't like the way I was managing it. His suggestions were ludicrous. If there's one thing I understand about the account I'm on, it's how to manage my time. I refused, telling him to send me what he just said on the Quallcomm and I'd reconsider. He hung up on me and I never heard anything more about the matter.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

That's 1 of the things I didn't like at Gardner's, the QC was just there to track hours n drive time, or sometimes get load info DM told me don't use it to send messages etc. I had sent 1 asking if anyone even monitors this thing or is it just a legal decoration??

Yep never go reply hahahaha ......So phones was only way to "TRY" n get a'hold of someone, not very often, or HOURS later! Poorest lack of communication, I've dealt with so far, drove me nuts.....Nights don't even bother trying to call dispatch no one ever would answer the phones!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Lets put it this way... Who is going to get the ticket from DOT when inspected? The company cannot "fix" a broken law or regulation

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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