The Ego Becomes The Downfall Of Many CDL Students: New Article By G-Town

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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We have a fantastic new article by G-Town today that is critical to a new driver's success:

The Ego Becomes The Downfall Of Many CDL Students

We've watched time and time again as students who were otherwise perfectly capable of becoming solid truck drivers either failed or were kicked out of school because they simply wouldn't focus on learning and improving themselves. Instead they focus on what they feel are the shortcomings of the school, the teachers, the equipment, and in most ways the entire world around them.

If you want to be successful in trucking it all starts with graduating from school and getting your CDL. As easy as that sounds, it turns out to be the end of a career, not the beginning, for an awful lot of people.

Read every word of G-Town's advice and take it to heart. This article is at the core of our teachings here at Trucking Truth and it could very well save your career.

The Ego Becomes The Downfall Of Many CDL Students

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
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Thanks G-Town! That was excellent; very well put, and incredibly insightful - a must read for new trucking students.

Rainy D.'s Comment
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Excellent! I often say A types make awesome truckers and lousy students. People are quick to bash trainers, but not all students are easy to deal with or ready to absorb the information. Often it takes them going solo to understand the lessons the trainer was teaching.

Road training can be more difficult than schooling because you are in close quarters in the trainers "mobile home". Many people complain about trainers but rarely reflect on their own actions. Many trainees make life difficult for the trainer but do not understand that.

I had a trainee who complained that I "contradicted him constantly" and everything was "my way or the highway". Yep! My truck, my way, thats highway I-81. Don't like it then get to stepping. I have proven I can do this job and not kill anyone, the trainee hadn't. It never once occurred to him that he was the one constantly contradicting me. He's a great trucker now though.

Bottom line, get through it. Like G Town, i bit my tongue a lot. I even cried on the phone a few times to my brother in the restroom away from my trainer. But i made it. You all reading this can too.

GTown described in this article how different trucking is. I was lucky because transitioning from an incredibly demanding job to this one made it easier on me. I can't imagine how i would have felt coming from a 9 to 5 job.

Basically, observe, absorb the info and get through training. Then you can run your truck your way.

Great job G Town!!!!

CK's Comment
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"As students we are also not there to... aggressively assist a failing student at the expense of our own learning..."

Thanks G-Town! This particular line was a good reminder for me, because I have experienced it first hand. I now recognize these fast paced training programs as a competition right from the beginning.

Big T's Comment
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Great article G-town. This is one that should be added to the welcome packet for new drivers.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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G-town-

What a great article. Well thought out and for me it rings to home. We had a student in my class that complained the whole time. But he and his brother are teaming together. But at least he's away from me now. Anyway so many things that you said about biting your tongue is so true. But I got through it and so can others. When we are kids we do things the kids way. But when we are adults it's time to act like an adult and do your job. CDL School and the training with your mentor is just a blimp on the radar screen. Before you know it you are doing your own loads. Now you are the captain and you are responsible for your actions. Sink or swim. Harsh maybe, but we have to deal with reality.

Again G- town thanks for this article. Training is going great so when this is over, I'm hoping to go OTR , because my mentor has a dedicated region that we do. N. Call, S. Call and then Utah. Well we got our load maybe he said he would call us in an hour. Be safe and all head what G-town- says it will serve you well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Michael S.'s Comment
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I love this, great article! As an incoming student with previous driving experience, I am taking this to heart and approaching my training as a new driver with humility and coach ability, as well as a desire to not bring any old bad habits of driving experience with me!

JoAnne EC's Comment
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Fantastic read, G-Town! Very well written, very informative; along with being successful drivers, there are a lot of talented writers here!

Not to sound full of myself, as I am QUITE the opposite, but I have always been a good learner and being teachable and taking instruction well are strong points for me. I am SO eager to get started and being patient over the next 3 years is going to be a huge challenge. But I am so excited that I have this big, scary, eye-opening, challenging, rewarding adventure to look forward to.

Thank you to everyone who writes the articles on TT. The information is invaluable! thank-you-2.gif

G-Town's Comment
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Thanks everyone.

Turtle's Comment
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Kudos G on an excellent article. I would often tell my new employees some of the very things you mentioned. Some would listen and some would get that far away glazed over look in their eyes. They didn't last long.

I'm sure the same applies to CDL students as well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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