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The Hazardous Materials Table

Figure 9.4 shows part of the Hazardous Materials Table. Column 1 tells which shipping mode(s) the entry affects and other information concerning the shipping description. The next five columns show each material's shipping name, hazard class or division, identification number, packaging group, and required labels.

hazmat-table.jpg

Column 1 – Six different symbols may appear in Column 1:

  • (+) 1. Shows the proper shipping name, hazard class, and packing group to use, even if the material does not meet the hazard class definition.
  • (A) 2. Means the hazardous material described in Column 2 is subject to the HMR only when offered or intended for transport by air unless it is a hazardous substance or hazardous waste.
  • (W) 3. Means the hazardous material described in Column 2 is subject to the HMR only when offered or intended for transportation by water unless it is a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, or marine pollutant.
  • (D) 4. Means the proper shipping name is appropriate for describing materials for domestic transportation, but may not be proper for international transportation.
  • (I) 5. Identifies a proper shipping name that is used to describe materials in international transportation. A different shipping name may be used when only domestic transportation is involved.
  • (G) 6. Means this hazardous material described in Column 2 is a generic shipping name. A generic shipping name must be accompanied by a technical name on the shipping paper. A technical name is a specific chemical that makes the product hazardous.

Column 2 — Lists the proper shipping names and descriptions of regulated materials. Entries are in alphabetical order so you can more quickly find the right entry. The table shows proper shipping names in regular type. The shipping paper must show proper shipping names. Names shown in italics are not proper shipping names.

Column 3 — Shows a material's hazard class or division or the entry “Forbidden.” Never transport a “Forbidden” material.

Placard hazardous materials shipments based on the quantity and hazard class. You can decide which placards to use if you know these three things:

  • Material's hazard class.
  • Amount being shipped.
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle.

Column 4 — Lists the identification number for each proper shipping name. Identification numbers are preceded by the letters “UN” or “NA.” The letters “NA” are associated with proper shipping names that are only used within the United States and to and from Canada. The identification number must appear on the shipping paper as part of the shipping description and also appear on the package. It also must appear on cargo tanks and other bulk packaging. Police and firefighters use this number to quickly identify hazardous materials.

Column 5 — Shows the packing group (in Roman numeral) assigned to a material.

Column 6 — Shows the hazard warning label(s) shippers must put on packages of hazardous materials. Some products require the use of more than one label due to a dual hazard being present.

Column 7 — Lists the additional (special) provisions that apply to this material. When there is an entry in this column, refer to the federal regulations for specific information. The numbers 1-6 in this column mean the hazardous material is a poison inhalation hazard (PIH). PIH materials have special requirements for shipping papers, markings, and placards.

Column 8 — Is a three-part column showing the section numbers covering the packaging requirements for each hazardous material.

Note: Columns 9 and 10 do not apply to transportation by highway.

Multiple-Choice Questions:

Question #397 (1 of 1)

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You will place placards on hazardous material shipments based on the quantity and hazard class. In order to decide what placard(s) to use on the outside of the vehicle, what must you know?

  • The amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle.
  • You must know all three of these
  • The material's hazard class.
  • The amount of hazardous materials being shipped by this particular shipper

Placard hazardous materials shipments based on the quantity and hazard class. You can decide which placards to use if you know these three things:

  • Material's hazard class.
  • Amount being shipped.
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle.

Normally the driver will not have to figure out what placards to use. The shipper is responsible for determining which placards to use and will supply those placards for you.

One exception may happen if you make multiple hazardous materials pickups for the same shipment. Each shipper will know what placards must be used for their particular shipment, but they won't know what placards are needed based on the sum of all of your hazardous shipments. Your company will help you determine this. In 15 years of driving, I never ran into this situation, but it can happen.

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