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10.3.2 – Evacuation Procedures

Be Prepared and Plan Ahead. When possible, assign two responsible, older student assistants to each emergency exit. Teach them how to assist the other students off the bus. Assign another student assistant to lead the students to a “safe place” after evacuation. However, you must recognize that there may not be older, responsible students on the bus at the time of the emergency. Therefore, emergency evacuation procedures must be explained to all students. This includes knowing how to operate the various emergency exits and the importance of listening to and following all instructions given by you.

Some tips to determine a safe place:

  • A safe place will be at least 100 feet off the road in the direction of oncoming traffic. This will keep the students from being hit by debris if another vehicle collides with the bus.
  • Lead students upwind of the bus if a fire is present.
  • Lead students as far away from railroad tracks as possible and in the direction of any oncoming train.
  • Lead students upwind of the bus at least 300 feet if there is a risk from spilled hazardous materials.
  • If the bus is in the direct path of a sighted tornado and evacuation is ordered, escort students to a nearby ditch or culvert if shelter in a building is not readily available and direct them to lie face down, hands covering their head. They should be far enough away so the bus cannot topple on them. Avoid areas that are subject to flash floods.

General Procedures. Determine if evacuation is in the best interest of safety.

  • Determine the best type of evacuation:
    • Front, rear or side door evacuation, or some combination of doors.
    • Roof or window evacuation.
  • Secure the bus by:
    • Placing transmission in “Park”; if there is no shift point, use “Neutral.”
    • Setting parking brakes.
    • Shutting off the engine.
    • Removing ignition key.
    • Activating hazard-warning lights.
  • If time allows, notify dispatch office of evacuation location, conditions and type of assistance needed.
  • Dangle radio microphone or telephone out of driver’s window for later use, if operable.
  • If no radio or the radio is inoperable, dispatch a passing motorist or area resident to call for help. As a last resort, dispatch two older, responsible students to go for help.
  • Order the evacuation.
  • Evacuate students from the bus.
    • Do not move a student you believe may have suffered a neck or spinal injury unless his or her life is in immediate danger.
    • Special procedures must be used to move neck spinal injury victims to prevent further injury.
  • Direct a student assistant to lead students to the nearest safe place.
  • Walk through the bus to ensure no students remain on the bus. Retrieve emergency equipment.
  • Join waiting students. Account for all students and check for their safety.
  • Protect the scene. Set out emergency warning devices as necessary and appropriate.
  • Prepare information for emergency responders.

Multiple-Choice Questions:

Question #480 (1 of 5)

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If the school bus is in the direct path of a sighted tornado and evacuation is ordered, what should you do?

  • You can do all of these
  • Escort students to a nearby ditch or culvert if shelter in a building is not readily available and direct them to lie face down, hands covering their head
  • Take them far enough away from the bus so the bus cannot topple on them
  • Avoid taking them to areas that are subject to flash floods
If the bus is in the direct path of a sighted tornado and evacuation is ordered, escort students to a nearby ditch or culvert if shelter in a building is not readily available and direct them to lie face down, hands covering their head. They should be far enough away so the bus cannot topple on them. Avoid areas that are subject to flash floods.
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Question #482 (2 of 5)

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If you get into an emergency as a school bus driver and there is no radio to call for help, what should you do?

  • Sit a safe distance from the bus and wait for help. They will come looking for you when they discover you are late.
  • Lead the entire group of students in the direction you feel you can find help the fastest
  • Dispatch a passing motorist or area resident to call for help. As a last resort, dispatch two older, responsible students to go for help.
  • Keep all students on the bus no matter what and wait for help to arrive
If no radio or the radio is inoperable, dispatch a passing motorist or area resident to call for help. As a last resort, dispatch two older, responsible students to go for help.
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Question #478 (3 of 5)

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What can you do as a bus driver to ensure safety in case of an emergency?

  • Teach all students how to operate the various emergency exits and the importance of listening to and following all instructions given by you
  • Assign an older student assistant to lead the students to a “safe place” after evacuation.
  • You can do all of these
  • When possible, assign two responsible, older student assistants to each emergency exit. Teach them how to assist the other students off the bus.
Be Prepared and Plan Ahead. When possible, assign two responsible, older student assistants to each emergency exit. Teach them how to assist the other students off the bus. Assign another student assistant to lead the students to a “safe place” after evacuation. However, you must recognize that there may not be older, responsible students on the bus at the time of the emergency. Therefore, emergency evacuation procedures must be explained to all students. This includes knowing how to operate the various emergency exits and the importance of listening to and following all instructions given by you.
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Question #481 (4 of 5)

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If you have an injured student with a possible head or neck injury, what should you do?

  • None of these are correct
  • Do not move a student you believe may have suffered a neck or spinal injury unless his or her life is in immediate danger.
  • Always get the student off the bus immediately
  • Never move the student, no matter what. Let emergency responders do that
Do not move a student you believe may have suffered a neck or spinal injury unless his or her life is in immediate danger.
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Question #479 (5 of 5)

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What can you do as a bus driver to ensure students are in a safe place during an emergency?

  • You can do all of these
  • Lead students as far away from railroad tracks as possible and in the direction of any oncoming train.
  • Lead students upwind of the bus if a fire is present.
  • Lead students to a safe place at least 100 feet off the road in the direction of oncoming traffic

Some tips to determine a safe place to lead students during an emergency:

  • A safe place will be at least 100 feet off the road in the direction of oncoming traffic. This will keep the students from being hit by debris if another vehicle collides with the bus.
  • Lead students upwind of the bus if a fire is present.
  • Lead students as far away from railroad tracks as possible and in the direction of any oncoming train.
  • Lead students upwind of the bus at least 300 feet if there is a risk from spilled hazardous materials.
  • If the bus is in the direct path of a sighted tornado and evacuation is ordered, escort students to a nearby ditch or culvert if shelter in a building is not readily available and direct them to lie face down, hands covering their head. They should be far enough away so the bus cannot topple on them. Avoid areas that are subject to flash floods.
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